• Call us! 647-700-8555

I provide Integration therapy and coaching for clients in Toronto west looking for practical, integrative help in dealing with overwhelming issues in their lives.

Guest post - Many people — and not just the Irish — use St. Patrick’s Day as an excuse to go overboard on booze — around 13 million pints of Guinness worldwide. Surveys show that it comes in as the fourth most popular drinking day of the year after New Year’s Eve, Christmas and Fourth of July. Not only does binge drinking propose a health hazard, but more than one in three drivers involved in a fatal car crash have a blood alcohol content over the legal limit, making it one of the most fatal driving days of the year. So, whether you’re avoiding alcohol because you’re in the midst of rehab (or a recovering addict), or you simply want to be safe and responsible, there are risk-free ways you can celebrate the luck of the Irish that still enjoyable.

Throw an Irish-inspired dinner party Gather a group on like-minded friends who also want to opt out of drinking and focus on eating — not drinking. To keep it festive, prepare traditional Irish dishes such as corned beef and cabbage, Irish stew, soda bread and bread pudding accompanied by a green mocktail or beverage like Green River soda. Don’t skimp out on creating a beautiful tablescape to make it feel more like a special dining experience. Decorate to boost your mood Whether or not you throw a party, adding touches of decor can boost your mood and help you get in the spirit — much like the effect of Christmas decorations. There’s no need to schuck out a bunch of money, however. If you have kids, use it as an excuse to have a DIY St. Patrick’s Day decor party where everyone pitches in to create green and shamrock-inspired items such as garland, banners, table decor and wreaths. A string of green twinkle lights can go a long way, too. Have an Irish film fest Pop the popcorn and turn your average movie night into an Irish film fest. When it comes to movies that take place in Ireland, there are plenty of good ones to choose from. Start with classics such as The Quiet Man and The Wind That Shakes the Barley before transitioning into modern-day flicks like The Commitments and Leap Year. Jam to some Irish tunes Many bars have live entertainment on St. Patrick’s Day and while that’s great, a beer-infused bar may not be the best environment if you’re avoiding alcohol. Instead, opt for your own at-home concert by playing upbeat traditional music such as "Skibbereen," "Finnegan's Wake," and "The Fields of Athenry." Classic bands to consider include the Clancy Brothers, The Dubliners and, The Wolf Tones. When you’re ready to transition into something more modern, there’s favorites like U2, Van Morrison, The Pogues and The Cranberries. Celebrate Making a list of what you feel lucky for in your life is a lot like having a gratitude session. Take some time for self-reflection — maybe you feel lucky you randomly met your husband, you landed your dream job, or simply that you are able to put food on the table every day. Along with the realization that St. Patrick’s Day started as a deeply religious holiday and not an all day drinking fest, relish in the fact that you won’t be hungover the morning after. While you don’t have to necessarily avoid parties and parades where alcohol is present, you’re more apt to have fun if you choose an activity that is not connected to booze — especially if you’re a recovering alcoholic. Celebrating sober is actually easier than you think if you have a game plan. Photo Credit: Pixabay
43529

Mutiny of the Soul

By Charles Eisenstein on Saturday May 21st, 2016
Mutiny of the Soul

Another Way of Looking at Fatigue and Depression

Depression, anxiety, and fatigue are an essential part of a process of metamorphosis that is unfolding on the planet today, and highly significant for the light they shed on the transition from an old world to a new. When a growing fatigue or depression becomes serious, and we get a diagnosis of Epstein-Barr or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or hypothyroid or low serotonin, we typically feel relief and alarm. Alarm: something is wrong with me. Relief: at least I know I’m not imagining things; now that I have a diagnosis, I can be cured, and life can go back to normal. But of course, a cure for these conditions is elusive. Read More...
This is by Brianna West. It's excellent!

Here’s What Your Subconscious Mind Wants You To Know, Based On The Way You Keep Self-Sabotaging Your Life

Sophia Sinclair
The way you are self-sabotaging: Going back to the same person who broke you. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: Evaluate your childhood relationships. If you find something comforting or appealing about someone who hurts you, there’s usually a reason.The way you are self-sabotaging: Attracting people who are too broken to commit in a real way. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You are not too broken to find someone who actually wants you. The way you are self-sabotaging: Being unhappy even when nothing is wrong. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You keep expecting outside things to make you feel good, rather than relying on changing how you think and what you focus on. The way you are self-sabotaging: Pushing people away. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You want people to love and accept you so much that the stress of it all makes you isolate yourself away from the pain, effectively creating the reality you’re trying to avoid. The way you are self-sabotaging: Automatically believing what you think and feel is true. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You want to worry because it feels comfortable, therefore safer. The way you are self-sabotaging: Eating poorly when you don’t want to be. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You are doing too much, or not giving yourself enough rest and nourishment. You are being too extreme. The way you are self-sabotaging: Not doing the work you know would help move your career forward. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You’re not as clear as you think you are on what you want to be doing. If it isn’t flowing, there is a reason. The way you are self-sabotaging: Overworking. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You do not have to prove your value. You do, however, have to stop running from the discomfort of being alone with your feelings. The way you are self-sabotaging: Caring too much about what other people think. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You are not as happy as you think you are. The happier you are with something, the less you need other people to be. The way you are self-sabotaging: Spending too much money. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: Things will not make you feel more secure. The way you are self-sabotaging: Dwelling on past relationships, or continually checking up on exes. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: This relationship affected you more than you were letting yourself believe. The ending hurt you more than you acknowledged, and you need to process that. The way you are self-sabotaging: Choosing friends who always make you feel like you’re in competition with them. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: Wanting to feel “better” than people is not a replacement for needing to feel connected to them. The common denominator is you. The way you are self-sabotaging: Having self-defeating thoughts that hold you back from doing what you want. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: Being mean to yourself first will not make it hurt less if other people judge or reject you. The way you are self-sabotaging: Not promoting your work in a way that would help move you forward. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You’re not putting your all into what you’re doing each day. Create things you are proud to share. The way you are self-sabotaging: Ascribing intent, or worrying that things are about you when they aren’t. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You think about yourself too often. The way you are self-sabotaging: Ending relationships you “should” have stayed in. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You’re choosing relationships based on society’s standards, not your own. The way you are self-sabotaging: Staying in a city you claim to dislike. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: Home is where you make it, not where you find it. The way you are self-sabotaging: Denying the obvious in order to “win” the argument. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: Your ego is fragile. Conversations are not about “winning,” they’re about learning. The way you are self-sabotaging: Wanting to be more attractive (read: thinner) than other people, because you think it makes you “better” than them. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You are insecure about the ways you perceive other people to be superior to you – trying to be more physically appealing is the most basic way to remedy that feeling, because you think it’s the one thing that you can solely control and everyone else can see. The way you are self-sabotaging: Procrastinating. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: Re-think what you’re doing. If it’s not coming to you naturally, it is not the right thing for you to be doing. The way you are self-sabotaging: Focusing on fear thoughts and irrational ideas. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You’re misusing the power of your mind. The way you are self-sabotaging: Mindlessly scrolling through social media as a way to pass the time. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You need to address the inherent discomfort you have when you don’t have something to distract you.
Bruce Tobin is coming to Toronto to facilitate two Holotropic Breathwork Workshops using image making as integration. Tickets are now on sale through Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/holotropic-breathwork-workshop-saturday-may-13th-tickets-31405007222?utm_campaign=new_event_email&utm_medium=email&utm_source=eb_email&utm_term=viewmyevent_button
this is brilliant! A new model of addiction overturns the antiquated notion of abstinence and prohibition which clearly haven't worked. The new model understands the root causes of substance abuse to be trauma. Healing the trauma heals addiction and it works! Read more here: http://ecosalon.com/a-new-model-for-addiction-at-home-in-the-dark/
This is a terrific trailer for a film about a groundbreaking approach to mental health. If you register for the town hall on the main page you get to watch the film for free. Look for the link in the email. CRAZYWISE Trailer from Phil Borges on Vimeo.
The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows is a fabulous reference, and it makes great reading too. Dip into a word and discover what it means. Having traded in tiny sorrows all my life, I had no idea many of them had names, like sonder, joupla, or adronitis. Every psychotherapist needs with own dictionary of tiny sorrows to help people make sense (or not) of their own.
This is a powerful video on how MDM-A can help so many people with trauma. MDM-A is like the key that opens up PTSD sufferers who are treatment resistant.  Then the psychotherapy can take hold. One day and I hope it's within a few years, people who suffer trauma will have the option of a short course of MDM-A and therapy rather than have to endure a lifetime of addiction and suffering.

Near Life Experience

Reminder Image

April 5, 2019 | Posted in Uncategorized | By

Read More...

5 Ways To Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day Without Alcohol

February 14, 2018 | Posted in Uncategorized | By

Guest post - Many people — and not just the Irish — use St. Patrick’s Day as an excuse to go overboard on booze — around 13 million pints of Guinness worldwide. Surveys show that it comes in as the fourth most popular drinking day of the year after New Year’s Eve, Christmas and Fourth of July. Not only does binge drinking propose a health hazard, but more than one in three drivers involved in a fatal car crash have a blood alcohol content over the legal limit, making it one of the most fatal driving days of the year. So, whether you’re avoiding alcohol because you’re in the midst of rehab (or a recovering addict), or you simply want to be safe and responsible, there are risk-free ways you can celebrate the luck of the Irish that still enjoyable.

Throw an Irish-inspired dinner party Gather a group on like-minded friends who also want to opt out of drinking and focus on eating — not drinking. To keep it festive, prepare traditional Irish dishes such as corned beef and cabbage, Irish stew, soda bread and bread pudding accompanied by a green mocktail or beverage like Green River soda. Don’t skimp out on creating a beautiful tablescape to make it feel more like a special dining experience. Decorate to boost your mood Whether or not you throw a party, adding touches of decor can boost your mood and help you get in the spirit — much like the effect of Christmas decorations. There’s no need to schuck out a bunch of money, however. If you have kids, use it as an excuse to have a DIY St. Patrick’s Day decor party where everyone pitches in to create green and shamrock-inspired items such as garland, banners, table decor and wreaths. A string of green twinkle lights can go a long way, too. Have an Irish film fest Pop the popcorn and turn your average movie night into an Irish film fest. When it comes to movies that take place in Ireland, there are plenty of good ones to choose from. Start with classics such as The Quiet Man and The Wind That Shakes the Barley before transitioning into modern-day flicks like The Commitments and Leap Year. Jam to some Irish tunes Many bars have live entertainment on St. Patrick’s Day and while that’s great, a beer-infused bar may not be the best environment if you’re avoiding alcohol. Instead, opt for your own at-home concert by playing upbeat traditional music such as "Skibbereen," "Finnegan's Wake," and "The Fields of Athenry." Classic bands to consider include the Clancy Brothers, The Dubliners and, The Wolf Tones. When you’re ready to transition into something more modern, there’s favorites like U2, Van Morrison, The Pogues and The Cranberries. Celebrate Making a list of what you feel lucky for in your life is a lot like having a gratitude session. Take some time for self-reflection — maybe you feel lucky you randomly met your husband, you landed your dream job, or simply that you are able to put food on the table every day. Along with the realization that St. Patrick’s Day started as a deeply religious holiday and not an all day drinking fest, relish in the fact that you won’t be hungover the morning after. While you don’t have to necessarily avoid parties and parades where alcohol is present, you’re more apt to have fun if you choose an activity that is not connected to booze — especially if you’re a recovering alcoholic. Celebrating sober is actually easier than you think if you have a game plan. Photo Credit: Pixabay

Read More...

Mutiny of the Soul

Reminder Image

May 22, 2017 | Posted in anxiety, balance, depression, Integrative, psychotherapy, reframe, suicide | By

43529

Mutiny of the Soul

By Charles Eisenstein on Saturday May 21st, 2016
Mutiny of the Soul

Another Way of Looking at Fatigue and Depression

Depression, anxiety, and fatigue are an essential part of a process of metamorphosis that is unfolding on the planet today, and highly significant for the light they shed on the transition from an old world to a new. When a growing fatigue or depression becomes serious, and we get a diagnosis of Epstein-Barr or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or hypothyroid or low serotonin, we typically feel relief and alarm. Alarm: something is wrong with me. Relief: at least I know I’m not imagining things; now that I have a diagnosis, I can be cured, and life can go back to normal. But of course, a cure for these conditions is elusive. Read More...

Read More...

What your subconscious mind wants you to know

Reminder Image

April 17, 2017 | Posted in Uncategorized | By

This is by Brianna West. It's excellent!

Here’s What Your Subconscious Mind Wants You To Know, Based On The Way You Keep Self-Sabotaging Your Life

Sophia Sinclair
The way you are self-sabotaging: Going back to the same person who broke you. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: Evaluate your childhood relationships. If you find something comforting or appealing about someone who hurts you, there’s usually a reason.The way you are self-sabotaging: Attracting people who are too broken to commit in a real way. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You are not too broken to find someone who actually wants you. The way you are self-sabotaging: Being unhappy even when nothing is wrong. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You keep expecting outside things to make you feel good, rather than relying on changing how you think and what you focus on. The way you are self-sabotaging: Pushing people away. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You want people to love and accept you so much that the stress of it all makes you isolate yourself away from the pain, effectively creating the reality you’re trying to avoid. The way you are self-sabotaging: Automatically believing what you think and feel is true. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You want to worry because it feels comfortable, therefore safer. The way you are self-sabotaging: Eating poorly when you don’t want to be. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You are doing too much, or not giving yourself enough rest and nourishment. You are being too extreme. The way you are self-sabotaging: Not doing the work you know would help move your career forward. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You’re not as clear as you think you are on what you want to be doing. If it isn’t flowing, there is a reason. The way you are self-sabotaging: Overworking. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You do not have to prove your value. You do, however, have to stop running from the discomfort of being alone with your feelings. The way you are self-sabotaging: Caring too much about what other people think. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You are not as happy as you think you are. The happier you are with something, the less you need other people to be. The way you are self-sabotaging: Spending too much money. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: Things will not make you feel more secure. The way you are self-sabotaging: Dwelling on past relationships, or continually checking up on exes. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: This relationship affected you more than you were letting yourself believe. The ending hurt you more than you acknowledged, and you need to process that. The way you are self-sabotaging: Choosing friends who always make you feel like you’re in competition with them. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: Wanting to feel “better” than people is not a replacement for needing to feel connected to them. The common denominator is you. The way you are self-sabotaging: Having self-defeating thoughts that hold you back from doing what you want. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: Being mean to yourself first will not make it hurt less if other people judge or reject you. The way you are self-sabotaging: Not promoting your work in a way that would help move you forward. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You’re not putting your all into what you’re doing each day. Create things you are proud to share. The way you are self-sabotaging: Ascribing intent, or worrying that things are about you when they aren’t. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You think about yourself too often. The way you are self-sabotaging: Ending relationships you “should” have stayed in. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You’re choosing relationships based on society’s standards, not your own. The way you are self-sabotaging: Staying in a city you claim to dislike. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: Home is where you make it, not where you find it. The way you are self-sabotaging: Denying the obvious in order to “win” the argument. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: Your ego is fragile. Conversations are not about “winning,” they’re about learning. The way you are self-sabotaging: Wanting to be more attractive (read: thinner) than other people, because you think it makes you “better” than them. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You are insecure about the ways you perceive other people to be superior to you – trying to be more physically appealing is the most basic way to remedy that feeling, because you think it’s the one thing that you can solely control and everyone else can see. The way you are self-sabotaging: Procrastinating. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: Re-think what you’re doing. If it’s not coming to you naturally, it is not the right thing for you to be doing. The way you are self-sabotaging: Focusing on fear thoughts and irrational ideas. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You’re misusing the power of your mind. The way you are self-sabotaging: Mindlessly scrolling through social media as a way to pass the time. What your subconscious mind wants you to know: You need to address the inherent discomfort you have when you don’t have something to distract you.

Read More...

Announcing 2 Holotropic Breathwork Workshops May 13th and 14th in Toronto

April 9, 2017 | Posted in Integrative, mental health, psychotherapy | By

Bruce Tobin is coming to Toronto to facilitate two Holotropic Breathwork Workshops using image making as integration. Tickets are now on sale through Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/holotropic-breathwork-workshop-saturday-may-13th-tickets-31405007222?utm_campaign=new_event_email&utm_medium=email&utm_source=eb_email&utm_term=viewmyevent_button

Read More...

A New Model of Addiction

Reminder Image

March 16, 2017 | Posted in anxiety, depression, mental health, psychedelic psychotherapy, psychotherapy, suicide | By

this is brilliant! A new model of addiction overturns the antiquated notion of abstinence and prohibition which clearly haven't worked. The new model understands the root causes of substance abuse to be trauma. Healing the trauma heals addiction and it works! Read more here: http://ecosalon.com/a-new-model-for-addiction-at-home-in-the-dark/

Read More...

Why normal, healthy people see a psychotherapist

Reminder Image

March 7, 2017 | Posted in anxiety, balance, depression, Integrative, mental health, psychotherapy, Uncategorized | By

Psychotherapy from Isaac Holland on Vimeo.

Read More...

Crazy Wise

Reminder Image

March 4, 2017 | Posted in anxiety, balance, depression, Integrative, mental health, psychotherapy | By

This is a terrific trailer for a film about a groundbreaking approach to mental health. If you register for the town hall on the main page you get to watch the film for free. Look for the link in the email. CRAZYWISE Trailer from Phil Borges on Vimeo.

Read More...

Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

Reminder Image

January 5, 2017 | Posted in Integrative, psychotherapy | By

The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows is a fabulous reference, and it makes great reading too. Dip into a word and discover what it means. Having traded in tiny sorrows all my life, I had no idea many of them had names, like sonder, joupla, or adronitis. Every psychotherapist needs with own dictionary of tiny sorrows to help people make sense (or not) of their own.

Read More...

MDM-A Tedx talk by British Psychiatrist

Reminder Image

October 19, 2016 | Posted in anxiety, Integrative, psychedelic psychotherapy, psychotherapy, suicide | By

This is a powerful video on how MDM-A can help so many people with trauma. MDM-A is like the key that opens up PTSD sufferers who are treatment resistant.  Then the psychotherapy can take hold. One day and I hope it's within a few years, people who suffer trauma will have the option of a short course of MDM-A and therapy rather than have to endure a lifetime of addiction and suffering.

Read More...